It’s a hot topic among cultivators, whether wet trimming or dry trimming is better. Like everything when it comes to growing, it’s a matter of preference.

Both dry trimming and wet trimming have their benefits, but neither are perfect. Some growers use a combination of the two for the best results, while others will always claim one over the other.

But if you’re here, it might mean you are trimming for the first time, not sure what the differences are between the two, or just need to refresh your memory before harvest!

Wet vs Dry trimming

The basics of these two trimming methods are easy. Wet trimming involves trimming your flowers right after they get cut off the mother plant. Dry trimming is when you wait until your flowers have had time to dry before you start trimming them.

Simple enough, but there’s reasons why people prefer each method, or a variation of both.

Wet trimming

One of the biggest benefits of wet trimming is that your flowers are basically still alive when you trim them. This means that the excess leaves will be easier to access, and trim off.

Wet trimming is easier for new growers because the leaves are easier to cut when the plant is fresh. Additionally, trimming off all of the leaves when they are fresh and easier to cut means you won’t have to trim again after the flowers dry.

Overall, wet trimming is fast and efficient. It can also be cheaper than dry trimming if done properly.

Dry trimming

The process of dry trimming is longer than wet trimming for obvious reasons, the most obvious being that you have to wait for the flowers to dry before you trim them. If you’re not in a rush however, leaving the leaves on the flowers to dry and shrink can help preserve moisture, stopping your flowers from drying out too fast.

After drying, you will have smaller leaves to cut, but they can be more difficult to reach after they shrink and hug the flower. This makes hand trimming dry flowers more difficult, which is why it always helps to have more hands!

Dry trimming is a longer, more difficult process than wet trimming. However, fans of this method swear by the end product and the quality of their flowers when given time to dry without being tampered with.

When it comes down to wet vs dry trimming it can depend on skill level, patience level, and preference. While wet trimming is fast and efficient, it can result in damaged flowers and loss of quality.

Dry trimming may be more difficult and time-consuming, but the extra drying time and effort can be worth it if done right.

What’s your favorite way to trim? Do you get right into it as soon as you chop, or do you wait for your plants to dry before you start trimming? Let us know!

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